Out of My Groove

You ever fall out of love with a work-in-progress, even after 60+K words? That’s my current rut after applying dozens of hours on The Sheriff of Jefferson County. Getting to this point was the usual pantser rodeo, the whirlwind of character and location development on the fly, but the energy is gone now. I’ve no real emotional desire to complete the book, though Maggie and crew will be a series. I’m more fascinated with the sequels than the first book.

It’s not that I didn’t try to get back in the groove: plotted out the previous chapters, did some on-the-fly editing, added the four S’s (sights, sounds, smells, sex), and rewrote a couple of chapters so they flowed better with the rest of the book. Yeah, no love, no luck.

Though they’re no excuse, Real World events jumped onto the dog pile, not the least of which were some health scares, a flooded basement, and the fact that my country’s leadership is bat-shit crazy. I hesitate to mention the RW because writers must be stronger than the distractions around them. I’ve published several books by overcoming reality, and I will publish again.

The best thing to do is to sit my wide butt down in front of the white box and finish the damn book without thinking about the damn book. A vacant brain can be both a good and bad thing in that the book’s destination is below the horizon, therefore I can’t be intimidated by something that doesn’t exist. I might wander off the reservation a little (that being the main plot), but, hey, that’s why we edit.

Have you been challenged by your incomplete works? What did you do to kick start your ass to the finish? Any and all words of wisdom welcomed!

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2 replies to “Out of My Groove”

  1. George McNeese says:

    Incomplete works seem to follow me around. A lot of it stems from disinterest in a particular work. I have a bad habit of jumping from one project to another. This past November, when everyone was doing NaNo, I decided to work on three stories. I decided to focus on getting these stories finished, but I had to prioritize and decide which was the most important.

    I’m in a similar situation now. It seems like I’ll never get the lesson of taking on one project at a time. But like before, I will write my story based on priority. It’s the only way I’ll get anything done.

  2. Carol Hedges says:

    Oh challenged all the time, probably every 5 thousand words. It’s part of being a writer. You just have to get on with it …paragraph by paragraph….and then leave it alone to fester for a bit. Then is usually comes right.

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